Oatmeal Shampoo Can Help Relieve Your Pom’s Itchy Skin

Oatmeal Shampoo Can Help Relieve Your Pom’s Itchy Skin

bath pomeranianIf your Pomeranian has itchy skin, you can use oatmeal shampoo to provide relief. This may also help relieve other skin conditions your pom may have. It’s time to learn more about how such shampoos can ease itchiness, as well as other benefits. You’ll also learn the way to make oatmeal shampoo for yourself.

How does oatmeal shampoo ease itchiness?
Oatmeal has been used as a cultivated crop as far back as the Bronze Age. Other civilisations such as the Egyptians, Romans and Greeks also saw the potent benefits of oatmeal as a way to protect the skin and make it more beautiful than ever.

Oatmeal has two forms when used for breakfast cereals. However, the third type is best for skin care and that’s colloidal oatmeal because it is ground into a powder for baths and pastes.

Two chemicals in oatmeal soothe irritated and itchy skin. These are called phenols and avenanthramides. Oatmeal helps balance the skin’s pH levels so it’s also useful for the relief of symptoms of psoriasis and eczema.

How Oatmeal Shampoo Helps Canine Skin Problems.
Oatmeal shampoo provides a range of benefits to dogs if they have skin issues. It can sooth and moisturise itchy skin. It helps ease allergy symptoms, hot spots, dry skin and tick and flea problems. This shampoo also acts as a coat cleaner and softener.

What Ingredients should an Oatmeal Shampoo contain?
When shopping for oatmeal shampoo, always read the labels thoroughly. You want to see ingredients that will help give your dog relief. Good ingredients include: tea tree oil, vitamin E and aloe. Avoid low quality ingredients. If you have doubts about what to buy, go for something that’s hypoallergenic or says it’s ideal for dogs whose skin is sensitive.


How You Make and Use Oatmeal Shampoo.
You can choose to make your own oatmeal shampoo with a few common household ingredients.
1. Grind a cup of oatmeal into powder with a food processor, coffee grinder or blender.
Combine with a quart of warm water and a cup of baking soda.
Blend until the ingredients are well mixed and then apply that mixture to your dog’s coat after making it as wet as possible.
Leave it on your pet for a minimum of 5 minutes and then thoroughly rinse off and towel dry.

2. If you prefer, you can add a cup of the ground oatmeal to a quart of warm water.
Stir the water as the oatmeal slowly mixes in and then place your dog into the tub and let him soak for around 15 minutes.
Massage the mixture deep into the coat so his skin gets the same attention as the coat.
Rinse your pom with warm water and towel dry.
Do this twice a week until you can see the improvements in your dog’s skin and coat.

3. You may elect to create an oatmeal shampoo that’s dry and can be applied to your pom’s fur.
Mix 1 cup of bran and 1 cup of oatmeal and spread the mix on a baking sheet.
Warm the sheet in an oven for 5 minutes at 200 degrees and then use a warm towel and slowly apply it to your dog’s coat.
Once finished, spend time fully brushing it all out of his coat.

Copyright Pomeranian.org. All Rights Reserved.

For more information on grooming your Pomeranian, brushing, brushes to use and how to care for a Pomeranian’s coat download our Pomeranian grooming booklet and Pomeranian grooming video.
pomeranian dog grooming

Choosing The Right Shampoo For Your Pomeranian

Choosing The Right Shampoo For Your Pomeranian

pomeranian dogWhat shampoo should I best use when bathing my Pomeranian?

It’s vital that you do research prior to choosing the products that are suitable for the skin and hair of your dog. Choosing the ideal shampoo means asking the right questions and waiting for the replies. It also varies according to whether your Pomeranian is a loved pet or a show dog.

A good shampoo is worth every penny because it will save on visits to the vet because of poor skin or coat problems on your dog. Your dog will lead a healthier, longer life as a result. Sorry the complete article is only available to our Premium members. Please join us now.
For more information on grooming your Pomeranian, brushing, brushes to use and how to care for a Pomeranian’s coat download our Pomeranian grooming booklet and Pomeranian grooming video.
pomeranian dog grooming

Copyright Pomeranian.Org. All Rights Reserved.


Pomeranian Coat Care

Pomeranian Coat Care

A Pomeranian doesn’t require as much grooming as some of the other long-haired breeds, but be prepared to at least brush your dog two or three times each week (or more if you can). Grooming should be a time enjoyed by both your Pomeranian and yourself. Your pet will go through many coat changes during his life.

For new Pomeranian owners, I’ll mention the first shed your puppy will go through as I have found many new owners aren’t prepared for all the changes the Pomeranian will go through during puppyhood.

pom puppy coat changePictured left: A 6 month old puppy. This Pomeranian puppy is going through the coat change. His coat is changing from a baby, puppy, fluffy coat to an adult Pomeranian coat. This period usually starts from three months of age and will end at around nine months, when the Pomeranian puppy should have a complete adult coat. This is also the time when you’ll notice your Pomeranian changing colour. The new adult Pomeranian coat will often be a darker colour or, if your puppy is any type of sable, he’ll change to a lighter colour than the baby puppy Pomeranian coat. Pomeranian puppies that don’t go through this coat change (“puppy uglies”) are often thought to be likely suspects for future coat loss problems in adulthood.

I have sold Pomeranian puppies with beautiful full, fluffy, baby coats at 8-10 weeks of age, only to receive a phone call from a very upset owner, when this Pomeranian was 5 – 6 months of age, to tell me that I had sold them a crossbreed. Their Pomeranian had no coat! I patiently explain that this is called the “puppy uglies” and that nearly all Pomeranian puppies have to go through this awkward stage of adolescence I assure the distressed owner that his ugly duckling will turn into a swan at 9 – 10 months of age. Then I have to explain about the 12 month shed of his first adult coat, about girls and seasons, and much more.

There are many factors that will affect the beauty of your Pomeranian’s coat. I believe that the amount and type of a Pomeranian’s coat is genetic. Adding supplements to the dog’s feed in the belief that these additives will improve the coat may be useful if his diet is lacking. I personally believe a better way is to feed your Pomeranian a balanced quality diet which removes the need for any additives. I feel harm may be done by adding supplements to your Pomeranian’s diet.

For complete and detailed Pomeranian information on feeding your new Pomeranian puppy: Download the Pomeranian Book by Pomeranian Breed Authority Denise Leo.

Keeping your Pomeranian free of internal and external parasites is an absolute necessity. Ear mites will cause your Pomeranian to scratch at his ears which will cause the hair behind the ears to quickly become matted. Fleas will cause him to scratch and bite at his coat and any internal parasites will cause the coat to look dull and drab. Hopefully your Pomeranian came from a long line of heavily coated dogs and you, as a conscientious owner, correctly care for your dog’s coat with regular brushing and bathing. Extra brushing will be required when your dog is shedding his coat. The dead coat must be removed as soon as possible to allow the new coat to grow. All loose hair must be removed or the result will be horrible matts that may have to be removed by clipping if let go too far! If you groom your Pomeranian on a regular basis, these problems won’t arise.

Please pay attention to the areas behind the ears and around the groin on your Pomeranian as these areas are prone to knots and tangles. The good news for owners of male Pomeranians is that once you have got him through to about 18 months of age, his coat will stay relatively the same for the rest of his life. With a Pomeranian female, however, you won’t be as lucky, as the hormonal changes with seasons often play havoc on a bitch’s coat. Whelping and rearing a litter usually results in a complete shed. It will take the little mother at least six months to regrow her coat and regain her beauty after a litter. Anaesthetics will also dramatically affect your Pomeranian’s coat.


I use the following methods to care for the Dochlaggie Pomeranians.

 Pictured right: Brushing your Pomeranian. Teach your Pomeranian to lay on each side for brushing. Also train him to lay on his back. If your pet is uncomfortable in these positions, a simple alternative is to brush him while he’s in your lap.

brushing your Pomeranian I have found each Pomeranian may need different treatment to achieve the effect I want. What works with one dog may not achieve the desired effect with another or what I found worked last year, or even last month may no longer give me the same results. All the Dochlaggie Pomeranians are bathed on a regular basis; the show dogs are done weekly and everyone else is done fortnightly during the summer months and at 4 to 6 week intervals during the winter months.

Clean hair grows and dirty hair breaks off. Regular bathing is also helpful in stopping many skin irritations from developing. As the Pomeranian is a double coated breed with a harsh textured coat, use a low-sudsing shampoo on your Pomeranian. The best results are obtained from bathing the show Pomeranians a day or two before a show. If your Pomeranian has the correct harsh, standoff, coat, bathing won’t soften it. On the other hand, if he has a softer textured coat than desired, you may achieve better results by bathing him 4 to 5 days before the show. It’s important to wash your dog often as dirt and dust are very drying and abrasive to a Pomeranian’s coat. Because of the drying qualities of talcum powder, this product should be used very sparingly on your Pomeranian.
Training your puppy to enjoy all this attention is very important. The Dochlaggie Pomeranians are groomed in front of a mirror. They just love looking at themselves being made beautiful. The added advantage is that I also get lots of practice setting up the dog and can easily check on how the Pomeranian is looking on the show side.

pomeranian's feetNails must be kept as short as possible in order to achieve a nice little “cat foot.” Remember to also check any unremoved dewclaws and keep these trimmed short. The hair around the anus may be kept short for cleanliness.
In the summer months, I clip any Pomeranian who won’t be attending dog shows in the coming months. They enjoy having a change of hairstyle for the hotter months and, by Winter, they have regrown a full coat again.

Always dampen the dog’s coat before brushing. Don’t brush a dry coat as this will cause split ends. I use 1 oz. of conditioner mixed in a spray bottle of rain water and mist the dog’s coat as I brush in sections from the skin out using ether a bristle or pin brush. Don’t use a pin brush with knobs on the ends of the pins as this type of brush may damage the coat. I find a Mason & Pearson bristle and nylon brush gives me excellent results with the harsh standoff coats on my Pomeranians.

If possible, don’t use silicone-based products on your dog as these conduct heat and will damage the coat. If you must use these products, never leave it on the coat any longer than 2 or 3 days before washing all traces from the coat and never use it in hot weather.

Grooming a Pomeranian Puppy with a slicker: Always brush your Pomeranian’s coat forward. Always flick the coat with the corners of the slicker because this won’t damage your Pomeranian’s coat. A large, very soft slicker is the best to use on your dog. Thinking that you only require a small slicker because your Pomeranian is small is a big mistake. Small slickers can easily damage your Pomeranian’s coat. Invest in quality grooming equipment for your Pomeranian. Copyright Pomeranian .org. All Rights Reserved.

Click here to download the Pomeranian grooming guide book

incorrect use of a slicker brushusing a slicker brush on your pomeranian

Cookies

Like most websites Pomeranian.org uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. This is done using simple text files called cookies which sit on your computer.

Password Reset
Please enter your e-mail address. You will receive a new password via e-mail.