Training and Behavior

  • This topic is empty.
  • Creator
    Topic
  • #1032128
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

     Description: Pomeranian Training & Behavior Group

    Welcome to our Pomeranian Training & Behavior Group, a community dedicated to helping you navigate the rewarding journey of training your Pomeranian. This group is your go-to resource for exchanging training tips, discussing behavioral challenges, and discovering effective solutions. Whether you’re trying to teach basic commands, tackle behavioral issues, or understand your Pom’s unique temperament, this group offers a wealth of knowledge and support.

    Here, you can expect to find:
    – Practical training tips tailored for the Pomeranian breed.
    – Advice on addressing common behavioral issues like barking, chewing, or separation anxiety.
    – Strategies for positive reinforcement and effective communication with your Pom.
    – Insights from experienced Pomeranian owners and trainers.

    This group is ideal for anyone looking to deepen their understanding of Pomeranian behavior and training techniques. Our supportive community is here to assist you, whether you’re training a new puppy or refining the behavior of an adult Pom. Join us in creating a harmonious and joyful relationship with your Pomeranian through effective training and understanding!

    Pomeranian Training
    Pomeranian Training

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

Viewing 12 replies - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #1889
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    Are Poms bad barkers or nippy?

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #1891
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    What is the temperament of the Pomeranian?

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #1982
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    brushing a PomeranianMy Pomeranian absolutely hates being brushed and bathed. She yelps, howls and growls when I try to do so! Is there any advice or handy tips anyone can give me to make it easier during bath and brush time?

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #1986
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    Pom pups bred at Dochlaggie are handled from birth so are well used to all types of grooming prior to going to new homes.
    You need to get on top of this NOW. Kindly and lovingly… but firmly let puppy know that grooming is a big part of his life. Just go ahead like you mean business (which you do) ignore the bad behaviour and accomplish what you set out to do with lots of cuddles and treats along the way.
    Train your Pomeranian to lay quietly on each side as well as on its back for brushing. If your Pomeranian is uncomfortable in these positions, a simple alternative is to brush the Pomeranian on your lap.
    The Dochlaggie babies are taught from a very early age to accept and enjoy grooming as part of their daily routine. I start at 3 weeks gently caressing the puppy and brushing the hair forward with my hand.
    At 4 to 5 weeks a small, soft bristle brush is then used to gently brush puppy’s hair forward.
    Teach your Pomeranian puppy that grooming is a fun and enjoyable time. The optimum time to begin grooming a young Pomeranian is following exercising and puppy’s evening meal. In other words close to puppy’s bedtime.
    When you first begin training your puppy to be groomed, start by grooming a small part of his body. For example, do his back in the morning, legs after lunch, and his tummy after your dinner and, finally, his neck at night. After each session, give him a treat so he’ll respond well to future grooming sessions and you’ll gradually be able to make them last longer. Try different positions. Get him sitting sometimes and standing at other times. Then he’ll be comfortable, regardless of what position you use when grooming him. Pomeranian Grooming Book

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #2074
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    We have 2 Pomeranians one is 7 months old one is 3 months old. How do we toilet train them they wee on our carpet constantly and its becoming a big problem.

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #2079
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    The Pomeranian is a delightful family member, loyal, extrovert, lively and very, very intelligent.

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #2302
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    Housebreaking fundamentals
    1.Dogs respond to odours and they’ll urinate where there is the smell of dog urine. Eliminate the smell associated with mishaps from your home by simply cleaning with white vinegar.
    2.Always take your puppy outside to “potty” after sleeping, eating and during playtime.
    3.Crate or confine your puppy to a small area at night and anytime you’re unable to monitor your puppy.
    4.When puppy urinates or defecates at the “potty” place, lavish lots of praise on puppy and give him a treat instantly. These actions tell puppy he has accomplished a wonderful thing. If preferred, you might include a command word while he’s performing his business.
    5.After success at the “potty” spot, puppy may have freedom of the home for a short period of time. The amount of time is based on his age.
    6.In the event of no results during a “potty break” after 5 minutes, bring puppy inside and place him in his crate for half an hour and then repeat the process.
    7.If you catch puppy in the act, yell NO and race puppy to the “potty” place. If puppy does “potty” more at the correct place, praise and treat. Thoroughly clean up the accident prior to returning puppy to the room.
    8.A young puppy must not be confined to a crate for lengthy periods of time. A general time line is to expect a Pomeranian puppy to be able to hold on for absolutely no more hours than the number of months of their age.

    Read More…

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #2678
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    How To Crate Train An Older Dog. Crate training is a very effective method for training a dog not to make messes in the house. It works because dogs hate soiling themselves in the same place where they sleep. A crate provides your dog with a place where he won’t want to make a mess. Once you have shown him where NOT to go, it becomes easier to show him where he’s allowed to do potty. This applies equally well to puppies and older dogs. It’s actually a good method for crate training an older dog.
    7 simple tips for crate training your older dog. READ MORE….

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #2960
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    Most people confuse their dogs because they change vocal and visual cues used. The same visual cues could mean different things. Words can be used in varying contexts so it’s hardly surprising that dogs don’t go crazy trying to interpret what their owners want. However, dogs are intelligent (for the most part) so they manage to figure out what you’re trying to tell them. Make it easier for your dog to know what you want and he’ll love you for it.

    Body language.

    The trouble with using body language is that what a human may think something means is actually different to the way a dog interprets it. Here are some guidelines you can follow to help with better communications:
    READ MORE….

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #3000
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    Some of the greatest times you spend with your Pom are when you’re both relaxing and watching TV, or fooling around at home where nobody can see the silly things you get up to. However, it’s also great fun being outside, whether you’re walking your dog along a path, around a sports ground or share good times in a doggie park where other people can also see you. These are just a few of the activities you can do with your beloved pet whilst outside the home.
    Playing in the park.
    Letting your dog run free in a dog park is great fun for both you and him. There are different types of parks. Some are open to anybody while others require a membership. Some parks request a payment each time you visit and others will keep the big and small dogs separate for safety. Some of the parks have equipment you can use. Avoid places where your pet can play with big dogs you don’t know or those who aren’t controlled by their owners. Never let your pet go anywhere prior to receiving all vaccinations. Then the real fun can start!
    Pomeranians love playing Fetch. READ MORE…..

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #3028
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    Because Pomeranians are toy dogs, you may be fooled into thinking they’ll spend every day sitting quietly and calmly. However, nothing could be further from the truth. They have boundless energy, running around inside your home, barking at shadows and jumping up and down at your feet.

    It’s fun to have an active dog but what if he’s hyperactive?

    It’s common for dogs who are very active to be labelled as “hyperactive,” when the truth is that they may not have enough ways they can burn off all their excess energy. If your Pom can be described in this way, you need to give him more exercise, both physical and mental, so he tires faster READ MORE…..

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

    #3046
    Avatar photoDenise Leo
    Keymaster

    I’m passionate about training puppies by using a leash. In some ways it resembles the way a human baby works out something new or sees something they haven’t seen before. Think of a ball of clay, waiting for your hands to mould it into something special.

    Remember that new puppies haven’t experienced wearing a leash until now. Most breeders don’t have time to ensure all puppies are properly crate and leash trained. This is good news because it means you can train your new puppy to do what YOU want and have loads of fun doing so.

    It’s critical to get your puppy used to a leash in a positive manner, READ MORE….
    READ MORE….

    Denise Leo
    Dochlaggie Best in Show Champions Australia

Viewing 12 replies - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.