Anal Glands

Anal Glands

pomeranianMore Than You Ever Wanted To Know About Anal Sacs

Anal sacs (also called “anal glands”) are the two smallish glands that sit inside your dog’s anus. The substance that’s excreted into these sacs can only be described as smelling vile. They’re oily, thick and stinky and have a distinct “fishy” smell. Most wild animals can voluntarily empty the sacs in self-defence or for scent marking. However, domesticated animals such as dogs no longer have this ability. Normal defecation and walking around are the two ways the sacs get emptied but there are times when animals can’t get them empty and they get impacted and very uncomfortable.
Sorry the complete article is only available to our Premium members. Please join us now.This is definitely a fallacy. If you ever have questions about the health of your dog, talk to the vet because he knows all about animals.

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Kennel Cough

Kennel Cough

white pomeranianOne health risk that’s common for dogs is being exposed to kennel cough (also known as Infectious Tracheobronchitis). There are a number of viruses and bacteria that can cause kennel cough. In fact, it’s common that the cause is a mixture of both viruses AND bacteria.

The most common viruses include: Canine Parainfluenza virus and canine adenovirus types 1 and 2.

 The most important organism that can cause kennel cough is a bacteria named Bordetella Bronchiseptica. If a dog has one or more of these organisms, he’ll get serious inflammation in his bronchi and trachea as well as a severe infection. Symptoms may last four days up to two weeks. However, most dogs will have symptoms 7-10 days after they have been exposed. The most typical symptom is a deep sounding honking-like cough that seems to hit quickly. The cough doesn’t usually produce anything and your dog may look like he’s dry retching, a problem in itself.

He’ll have coughing fits and then it will settle and become minor bouts. Coughing may become aggravated by activity, drinking water or when moving from places with different temperatures. E.g. a warm to a cool environment or the other way around. Most dogs that have kennel cough will behave normally except for the coughing. They’ll also eat normally. However, a dog may have a higher temperature reading (as high as 105°F), lose his appetite and have a nasal discharge.

You generally don’t need to treat your dog because the infection usually disappears on its own within 10 days. However, some dogs may cough for as long as three weeks. If the symptoms are severe, you may need to consult your vet and get medication to help settle the problem. If the cough is productive, let it continue (provided it doesn’t affect his ability to sleep and rest) because this can clear debris and inflammation. If the cough is productive and so annoying that your dog can’t get enough rest, a cough suppressant is indicated. You can use diluted over-the-counter human cough medicine or honey and the cough should settle. If not, consult your vet because more serious medications may be required. Antibiotics will be necessary, especially if his temperature is high for more than a couple of days. However, remember that antibiotics will only stop bacterial causes. The body’s natural defence systems will combat the viruses, in the same way they do in people. If the medications don’t work or the symptoms become worse, the dog should be taken to the vet to be reassessed.

Kennel cough can occur as part of more severe respiratory diseases and will need a more detailed diagnostic plan and treatment regimen. The dog has to be isolated from other dogs so it’s not spread. Organisms spread mainly on drops of water in the air and directly between dogs when they make contact. A vet generally recommends isolating the sick dog until there has not been any coughing for a minimum of seven to 10 days. So it doesn’t spread, the ventilation in the dog’s kennel needs to be increased to the point where the air is being swapped 12-15 times each hour. Humidity should be kept under 50% if at all possible. Crates, kennels and dishes must be washed thoroughly with powerful disinfectants and then let completely dry before they’re next used. Some vaccines can prevent kennel cough. These can be given as nasal drops or as an injection. The nasal drops seem to give a higher amount of protection.

Obviously no vaccine is perfect, they apparently have the capacity to reduce kennel cough. In most cases, kennel cough is only a minor problem for dogs but it can quickly become more severe and spread in groups quickly if ignored. All dog owners need to understand how they can prevent this debilitating disease and also how to reduce its ability to spread. It’s unfair to make other dogs sick if you take your infected dog for walks, present him at shows or let him play with other dogs.

Natural Remedies that can be used to boost your Pom’s immune system.

Vitamin C. Use it three times per day (250 mgs for small dogs). If you already use this regularly, then that’s very good. This should be added to whatever dose you currently use and should be spread out through the day.

Herbal tinctures. Echinacea. Give him a few drops three times each day, either in his mouth or on his food. Golden Seal. The same applies as with Echinacea.

Colloidal Silver. 1-2 drops three times per day either in his water or food. To specifically fight the kennel cough virus:

Homeopathic remedies: (they work when the right remedy and symptoms are matched, regardless of how potent the remedy is).

Bryonia. 1-2 pellets three times per day. Dog can’t eat for 10 minutes before and after taking the pellets. You can get this from most health food stores in a 6C or 6X strength and that’s an ok but if you can get 30C, that’s stronger.

Drosera. Used the same as Bryonia.

If your dog has an irritated/sore throat, a half teaspoon of honey three times every day will help. Avoid letting your dog be around second hand smoke and keep him in an even level humidity environment.

•Eliminate exposure to second hand smoke.

•Maintain humidity in the environment.

 

If you ever have concerns about your dog’s health, contact your vet. As with people, catching problems early means they can be treated faster and make a complete recovery.

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A guide to selecting a healthy Pomeranian Puppy

A guide to selecting a healthy Pomeranian Puppy

guide to selecting a healthy Pomeranian Puppy

A healthy Pomeranian Puppy

How to Buy a Healthy Pomeranian Puppy.

To stack the odds in your favour purchase your puppy from a registered SHOW Pomeranian breeder. You are purchasing a Pomeranian and you deserve to buy a dog which will conform closely to the breed standard.

Most Show Pomeranian breeders will prove their dogs in the show ring prior to breeding, do health testing and will spend many hours planning breedings. In contrast puppy farmers and backyard breeders only concern is to produce pups with no interest in the health or quality of the litter.

Prospective puppy buyers are advised to stop searching for a puppy, but instead focus on finding a breeder. This breeder will be the one with a high standard of ethics and who breeds the type of Pomeranians you most admire.

Be prepared to wait for your puppy as Pomeranians do not have large litters. Avoid breeders who always have pups available and/or offer pups without kennel club registration. All pups should be registered on either limited or main kennel club registration. Below is a list of the basic and most essential things to look for when selecting your new puppy:

Tips on what to look for in a Healthy Pomeranian Pup

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Retained Deciduous (Baby) Teeth

Retained Deciduous (Baby) Teeth

By the time Pomeranian puppies get to about six weeks old, they grow deciduous teeth, usually called baby teeth. Starting at about four months old, these teeth are replaced by the stronger, permanent teeth. It can take three to five months for a small puppy to replace the baby teeth with the stronger, permanent ones and this process is often slower for smaller puppies.
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Hypothyroidism In Dogs

Hypothyroidism In Dogs

If your dog seems sluggish and has a puffy-looking appearance, it may mean he has problems with his thyroid.

The thyroid gland produces various hormones including T3 (liothyronine) and T4 (levothyroxine) that help to maintain a normal metabolism

Hypothyroidism occurs when there’s a deficiency of the thyroid hormone. This problems happens to people as well as dogs. The thyroid hormone (also called thyroxine) affects virtually all organs in the body.
The deficiency happens generally when your dog’s immune system destroys his thyroid gland. More than 95% of all cases occur as a result of the destruction of this important gland. This vital gland sits just under the throat. The technical name for this problem is autoimmune hypothyroidism. Sometimes the gland simply wastes away with no known cause. This condition may be present when the puppy is born, in which case it can lead to a type of dwarfism.
Cats may also face this problem but it’s much rarer. It may happen if the cat has been treated for hyperthyroidism with too high a dose of medication. Dwarfism is extremely rare in cats.

Risk factors and identification.
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Liver Shunts

Liver Shunts

pomeranianAs the majority of you know, the liver can be described as an astounding organ. It has numerous vital functions such as:

Acting as a massive filter to eliminate blood-borne toxins.
Synthesising and distributing proteins for body’s use.
Storing sugar as glycogen.

This amazing organ needs a constant blood flow so it can do these jobs effectively. If there’s a liver shunt present, it means your pet’s blood flow has been compromised.

There are two main liver shunts and they are:
• Extra-hepatic (outside your pet’s liver).
• Intra-hepatic (inside his liver).

Although such shunts are generally problems faced by dogs, cats may also have them sometimes.

How does a liver shunt form?
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Tracheal Collapse (Collapsing Trachea)

Tracheal Collapse (Collapsing Trachea)

pomeranian puppyTracheal collapse is a serious problem which can be encountered in small breed dogs . This is where the cartilage rings around the trachea (windpipe) are weakened and collapse inwards, obstructing the windpipe and making the dog cough. There’s no single recognised cause but it’s believed many factors contribute to this problem. The trachea is a circular tube that’s rigid and goes from the throat to the chest. If it does collapse, it’s from top to bottom, not side-to-side. The chest part is usually the collapsed area but any part of the tube can collapse and cause problems. The most likely cause is the abnormal synthesis of parts of the cartilage that are found in the trachea. This is a structural part of his trachea. It’s a disease and unpleasant coughing spasms are the result because the trachea flattens out and blocks the air flow to and from the dog’s lungs.

Other possible causes include:

• Congenital defects.

• Tumours that externally compress the trachea.

• Trauma.

• Chronic airway disease. There are a number of other medical problems that can cause your dog to cough, which contributes to the collapsing trachea. They include Sorry the complete article is only available to our Premium members. Please join us now. It’s common for the pet to be given pain relief, which is usually mild to moderate. You must ensure your pet remains calm and much less active than usual until the stitches are taken out. Avoid allowing him to scratch or rub the site which has to be cleaned daily until it finally heals. Check for signs of swelling or redness. With a temporary procedure, your pet won’t have the tube still in place but he’ll have the opening that, in time, will heal over. He’ll be able to breathe properly again. If he has bad coughing bouts or trouble breathing, contact the vet urgently.

How long will your dog remain in hospital after the procedure?

Your pet will stay for about 2-3 days but this can vary according to how well the procedure went. He obviously won’t be released until the surgeon is happy with his progress.

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Causes of Hair Loss

Causes of Hair Loss


Pomeranian dog with coat loss Lots of diseases and other medical issues can cause dogs to lose some of their hair. Some reasons may be regarded as “normal,” whilst others may indicate that your pet has a serious disease. Listed in the table below are the majority of ailments that cause dogs to lose hair, even a few that are rare.This comprehensive list enables you to appreciate why a vet may be unable to diagnose a problem quickly and he must perform numerous diagnostic tests. The conditions that are underlined within this table are the most common problems. However, geographic locations may cause some of the results to vary. Sorry the complete article is only available to our Premium members. Please join us now.Copyright Pomeranian.Org. All Rights Reserved.
 

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