The First Pomeranian Champions

The First Pomeranian Champions

ROB OF ROZELLE normal_spthefirstpomeranianchampion         Sire: Unknown      Dam: Unknown Colour: White   Breeder:  Unknown            

KONIG OF ROZELLE normal_spthesecondpomeranianchampion         Sire: Rob of Rozelle     Dam: Peggoty Colour: White   Breeder: Miss Hamilton        

BELPER SNOW champion pomeranian belper snow       Sire: Belper Bounce    Dam: Belper Glenis Colour: White   Breeder: Miss Chell          

BELPER FRITZ

Sire: Snap Jack  Dam: Belper Rosie Colour:  White   Breeder: Mr Chell  

BELPER SPRITE

Sire: Belper Fritz  Dam: Belper Minnie Colour: White   Breeder: Miss Chell  

BELPER FLOSSIE Sire: Rob of Rozelle  Dam: Belper Minnie Colour: White   Breeder: Mr Chell  

BELPER PEGGIE Sire: Belper Don  Dam: Belper Beauty Colour: White   Breeder: Miss Chell  

TATCHO Sire: Belper Snow  Dam: Belper Pearl Colour: White   Breeder: Mrs Birkbeck  

THE LADY FROU-FROU Sire: Belper Fritz   Dam: Belper Glennis Colour: White   Breeder:  Miss Chell  

THE LADY VERNA Sire: Tatcho  Dam: The Lady Frou-Frou Colour: White   Breeder: Miss Lee-Roberts  

BLACK BOY Sire: Leiblung  Dam: Lulu Colour: Black   Breeder: Mrs Ireland  

KING PIPPEN Sire: Unknown  Dam: Unknown Colour: Black   Breeder: Unknown  

HATCHAM NIP Sire: Unknown  Dam: Unknown Colour: Black   Breeder: Unknown  Owner :  Mrs Marlow 4.5 lbs. Champion Hatcham Nip was exported by his owner to the USA, Becoming the first Pomeranian to win on both sides of the Atlantic. C.C. winner twice at Crufts dog show.  

MARLAND KING Sire: Kensington King   Dam: Orange Girl Colour: Black   Breeder: Mrs Day  

WALKLEY QUEENIE Sire: Belper Checky Dam: Belper Sadie Colour: Black   Breeder: Miss Chell  

LITTLE BILLIE BOY Sire: King Pippen Dam: Vera Colour: Brown   Breeder: Mrs Bird  

TINA Champion Tina       Sire: Bayswater Swell Dam: Kitsey Colour: Brown   Breeder: Mrs Addis              

PRAIRIE KING Sire: Bayswater Swell Dam: Queenie Colour: Brown   Breeder: Mrs. Harvey

Pedigree Of PRAIRIE KING
Sex Dog
Parents Grandparents Great Grandparents
BAYSWATER SWELL NUBIAN KING  
 
HIYYA  
 
QUEENIE PRAIRIE SQUIRE  
 
TENA  
 

  KING OF THE FAIRIES Sire: Kensington King  Dam: Queen Mab Colour: Brown   Breeder: Miss Fox-White  

HAUGHTY PRINCE pomeranian ch haughty prince       Sire: Aigburth Prince Dam: Haughty Muriel Colour: Brown   Breeder: Mrs. Houlker           MOORLAND PIXIE Sire: Moorland Brownie   Dam: Fairy Colour: Brown   Breeder: Lady Conyers  

GOLDEN TINA champion pomeranian golden tina       Sire:  Fritzkin  Dam: Sissy Colour: Brown   Breeder: Mr Taylor              

FRITZKIN Sire:  unknown  Dam: unknown Colour: Brown   Breeder: unknown   TINY BROWN Sire:  Reigate Masher  Dam: Blanquettes Brunette Colour: Brown   Breeder: Mrs Sanderson  

CHOCOLAT Chocolat owned by Mrs Harcourt Clare             Sire:  Black Boy  Dam: Judy Colour: Blue   Breeder: Mr Marples Owner:  Mrs Harcourt Clare              

BOY BLUE champion pomeranian boy blue               Sire:  Prince Victory  Dam: Princess Zulu Colour: Blue   Breeder: Mrs Fisher Owner: Miss Ives                        

DAINTY BOY Sire:  Unknown Dam: Unknown Colour: Shaded Sable   Breeder: Unknown  

DAINTY BELLE Sire:  Dainty Boy  Dam: Bibury Belle Colour: Shaded Sable   Breeder: Mrs Hall-Walker  

BIBURY BELLE Sire:  King Khama  Dam: Bibury Maggie Colour: Shaded Sable   Breeder: Mrs Judge  

RUFFLE Sire:  Unknown Dam: Unknown Colour: Shaded Sable   Breeder: Unknown  

NANKY PO (KCSB) pomeranian Nanky Poo Sire:  Dr Nansen Dam: Lady Clare Colour: Shaded Sable   Breeder: Mr. W. Birkinshaw Weight 8.5 lbs Born 23rd September, 1901 Has won 40 prizes and many specials, including First and Hall-Walker Cup for best sable at Crufts; First Brighton; First Crystal Palace Kennel Club Show 1903; First Birkenhead; Two firsts and first Brace and Team at Manchester Pomeranian Club Show; Two firsts and first Brace and team at Darlington; First and first Brace at Lancaster; First Cheetham Hill: Second Open, first Team Crystal palace Kennel Club Show 1904.

Pedigree Of CH NANKY POO
Sex Dog
Parents Grandparents Great Grandparents Great Great Grandparents
DR NANSEN BOBS BAYSWATER SWELL NUBIAN KING
HIYYA
URSA  
 
BOOTLE’S BABY    
 
   
 
LADY CLARE LORD NELSON BOUNCE  
 
ROSE  
 
MAY QUEEN    
 
   
 

THE SABLE MITE (KCSB) Pomeranian The Sable Mite Sire:  Little Nipper  Dam: Laurel Fluffie Colour: Shaded Sable   Breeder: Mr. P. Hirst Weight 4.5 lbs Born 21st December, 1902 Winner of 70 prizes and numerous specials. prizes include during 1904: Four first Blackpool. Three firsts Reigate. Three firsts Hitchin. Two firsts and the championship Birkenhead. Two firsts, silver shield for Best Pomeranian in Show and first in Brace, Team and Non-Sporting Team Richmond; three firsts and championship also first Brace and Team, Darlington; three firsts and special for Best Pomeranian in the Show Baldock, two firsts and Burton Cup (won outright) for best dog any breed in the show Bakewell: two firsts and Hall Walker Cup for best sable, also first Brace and Team Crystal Palace Kennel Club Show, also Pomeranian Club Challenge Cup.

Pedigree Of CH THE SABLE MITE
Sex Dog
Parents Grandparents Great Grandparents
LITTLE NIPPER English Champion HATCHAM NIP  
 
PENNY EDELMANN OF ROZELLE
LADY CRYSTAL
LAUREL FLUFFIE CLAYTON MASHER ROCCO
OLIVETTE
QUEENIE PRAIRIE SQUIRE
TENA
.

    SHELTON SABLE ATOM Shelton Sable Atom Sire:  Little Nipper  Dam: Cinderella Colour: Shaded Sable   Breeder: Mr. J.  Fielding Weight 4.5 lbs Born  10th September, 1903. Prizes won during 1904 include four firsts and special for best Toy, Harpenden; Three firsts at Sheffield; Three firsts and best Brace and Team Manchester Pomeranian Club Show; two firsts, first in the Brace, team and non-sporting team and 25 gns. cups for Best novice Pomeranian, Richmond; one first, Darlington; two firsts and special for best Pom. in the Show, Woodstock; two firsts and the championship, Southampton; one first and two seconds ( beaten only by the Sable Mite), Crystal Palace kennel Club Show. he won altogether 43 prizes and many specials before he was 14 months old.  

Pedigree Of CH SHELTON SABLE ATOM
Sex Dog
Parents Grandparents Great Grandparents Great Great Grandparents
LITTLE NIPPER English Champion HATCHAM NIP    
 
   
 
PENNY EDELMANN OF ROZELLE  
 
LADY CRYSTAL  
 
CINDERELLA AIGBURTH PRINCE BAYSWATER SWELL NUBIAN KING
HIYYA
AIGBURTH QUEEN  
 
PENNINE BELLE PRINCE KHAMA  
 
LADY FLOSSIE  
 

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Pomeranians and Shedding

Pomeranians and Shedding

pomeranian coat changes Contrary to popular belief Pomeranians don’t shed much fur. Most longhaired dog breeds also don’t shed heaps all the time. The shedding can be easily managed with most long coated breeds because it’s seasonal and, in the case of bitches, hormonal shedding after a season or after weaning a litter of pups. In contrast to Pomeranians and other long-haired dog breeds, smooth coated dogs are heavy shedders and they usually shed coat every day.

pomeranian in full coat

Pomeranian in full coat

There are 3 types of shedding experienced by Pomeranians:

1. The puppy uglies is the name for the period when Poms lose their “baby/puppy” fur and then grow their adult fur.

2. Seasonal shedding is experienced by most adult Pomeranians.

3. Pomeranian females typically go through a total shed after weaning a litter, due to hormonal changes.

Puppy shedding

Your puppy will be age 4 – 6 months when he starts to shed his baby fur. All puppies are different, of course, and the entire process will take around five 5 months before all the puppy fur is gone and he has adult fur. Your puppy’s baby coat gets replaced by an adult double coat; the outer layer is long guard hairs and the inner layer is dense and thick. The colour of your Pom’s fur can significantly change during this period. As an example, a heavily sabled Pomeranian baby may end up with an orange adult coat or a white Pom puppy can go through the puppy shedding stage to end up as a cream coloured Pom.

While the puppy fur is being shed, your pet can look quite funny. This is because, at different times during the process, he’ll have patches of fur that are missing. Don’t be concerned because this is normal and won’t last long. Once your puppy is 10 months old, his adult fur will be really starting to grow. By the time he hits the 12 – 15 month point, his adult coat will have completely taken over. You’ll feel the coat’s differences. A puppy has very soft fur and that will be replaced with a double coat consisting of harsh guard hairs and the soft fluffy undercoat.

Adult Pomeranian Shedding

Some Pomeranians will do a complete shed once again during the 12 – 18 month period. There does appear to be a greater chance of this occurring if your puppy turns 12 months old while it’s summer. After 18 months, your Pomeranian may do light seasonal sheds.

Pomeranian Louise Babbage after dropping coat.

Pomeranian Louise Babbage after dropping coat.

There are several variables that govern when your Pom will shed. The climate you live in and the environment the puppy grows up in are both key factors. Light changes are also a factor and if it’s a major element in your pom’s shedding patterns, then shedding will likely occur twice a year. You can expect most adult Pomeranians to do some seasonal shedding. The seasonal shedding will be a heavier shed with females who haven’t been desexed. They’ll often experience shedding after each season. Adult desexed Poms of both sexes will undergo some light seasonal shedding. During the shedding process, how much fur will your Pom lose? If adults lose too much fur, to the point where there are patches missing, this isn’t regarded as normal, unlike puppies who do have it normally. Adult Poms rarely lose that much fur except if they’re females (as listed in the third shedding option). If patches appear, there’s a medical cause and you must contact your vet urgently. The reasons why this occurs includes: thyroid troubles, allergies, mange and much more. Your vet will do a barrage of tests and examinations to determine the actual cause and then the right treatment can begin.

The third type of Pomeranian shedding is the total shed after an adult female has whelped a litter of babies. Mothers typically do a total shed when the litter is six to eight weeks of age. A time period of at least six months is invariably required following a litter for a Pomeranian mother to return to her former full-coated beauty. Don’t be concerned about your new mother’s complete shed as this is normal owing to hormonal changes.

Removing shed hairs is vital Pomeranian owners should be prepared to brush the coat daily with a pin and slicker brush to remove dead hair during the moulting period. The quicker you remove the dead coat, the faster new hair will grow in its place. Brushing daily will also reduce the need to remove your Pom’s dead coat from your furniture and clothing.

white pomeranian shedding coat

White Pomeranian after a total coat shed.

You need to remember that if a dead coat isn’t removed speedily, it will become matted and that often leads to skin yeast infections and other canine ailments. If a matt occurs, it requires lots of work to extricate it without cutting it off. Coat conditioner can help, if applied, as it helps loosen the matt and the tip of a grooming comb should be ideal to get it out. If it doesn’t happen, you’ll have to cut the fur to prevent the matt from growing in size. The shedding of dog fur is a natural, healthy renewal process.

However, you need to groom your Pomeranian regularly to control the loose coat and avoid having hair spread all around your home

1. The best type of brush to use when your Pom is shedding is a large, soft slicker brush, together with a large dog comb and a good quality pin brush. If you’re able to run a comb through your Pomeranian’s coat without any hair coat coming out, brushing for that session is complete.

2. Plan a schedule for when you will do the grooming. It’s easier to do when you have the task included in the plan for a busy day. Some owners enjoy doing it after dinner, while they relax in front of the TV.

3. If you have nice weather, do it outside if you can. Warm, dry weather is ideal. Doing the grooming outside helps reduce the mess.

4. If your pet has been a member of your family for more than a year and you haven’t tried using a tape lint roller on your carpet, you’ll be amazed at what you’ll find. Regular vacuum cleaners aren’t powerful enough to grab all dog hair. Get a vacuum that’s designed for pet owners and the better models have special filters that can catch allergens that may affect your pet and your human family as well.

5. Don’t forget parts of your Pom’s coat. When he sheds, many owners mainly work on their pets’ backs due to it being the biggest area. However, fur can fall from any part of your pet’s body, and that includes his tail. So, the best way to deal with a heavy shed is to start brushing the underneath area first – e.g. the tummy area, then move to the chest area, hairs on the legs, ruff, pants, tail and then move onto to the back last.

6. Bathe your dog every week and shampoo and condition his fur well. Blow as much dead hair out with a dryer, prior to brushing.

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Pomeranian Temperament

Pomeranian Temperament

Pomeranian dogI would like to share my observations on the Pomeranian’s temperament. Benefit from my extensive knowledge of the Pomeranian breed, over 50 years involvement with Poms as an owner, breeder and exhibitor of close to 100 Champion Pomeranians. Visit the Dochlaggie Pomeranian website. Although Pomeranians are small dogs, only weighing 3 – 7 pounds, their personalities are as big as many larger dogs. Pomeranians are ideal as family pets, and generally are: playful, energetic, loyal, loving, lively, outgoing and quite intelligent. Because Poms are intelligent and playful, they require lots of mental stimuli so they’re kept busy. They’re fiercely independent and succumb to “small dog syndrome,” a trait they share with numerous other small dog breeds. They require plenty of training to help them be social and to ensure good behaviour. Poms respond well to training and enjoy learning, so it generally becomes easier to train them as you add new elements to the training regime. Pomeranians are an alert breed, acutely aware of environmental changes. If they bark when faced with any new stimuli, that can create the bad habit of too much barking without a valid reason. Because they’re extremely defensive when it comes to new stimuli in their territory, they’re likely to bark at any sounds outside, regardless of whether it’s somebody walking past the house or a person coming to the front door. These dogs sometimes use their intelligence as a tool to get everything they want from the person or family who own them. As extroverts, they love being the centre of attention. However, if you don’t set rules for them to follow, they can be naughty. They make fantastic watchdogs because they’re very alert, partly because they’re also very curious. They love being outside and, if possible, they’ll either peek through the curtains or sit on a window sill and watch the world moving around outside. Your Pom will bark to warn you if somebody is at your front door. Poms are lap dogs. This doesn’t mean they’ll want to spend every day sitting in your lap. However, they’ll want to stay close to you as much as possible. Poms are normally inside dogs but that doesn’t squash their desire to explore the world outside of their home. They love running around and, in extremely cold temperatures, they need protection to keep them warm. If your dog has been cooped up inside all day, he’ll love it if you grab his leash and take him for a long walk or to the local dog park so he can run around. Poms love exploring new things, whether they’re sounds, smells, visual things or sounds. The natural Pom temperament means that most will want to sleep with you, usually in your bed so they feel safe, happy and more relaxed. However, it’s crucial that you be aware of the little body in your bed, especially Pom puppies as they’re so tiny.Pomeranian dog You may roll over in bed and squash your puppy by accident, which would also frighten the puppy. He may fall off the bed if he moves while asleep. If you allow your pet to sleep in your bed for any length of time, it’s almost impossible to break him of this habit and make him sleep in a doggie bed. Many people wrongly believe that a pom is naturally a barker when he’s actually not a habitual. Barking usually happens when he wants your attention, if there are strangers at your door or near you when you’re out walking together. In general, Poms aren’t the “yappers” that lots of people believe. The Pomeranian is a glamourous little dog with heaps of big dog attitude. A tiny dog that wants to escort you everywhere, a cute little dog who wants to cuddle up close to his owner whenever possible. Copyright Pomeranian.org. All Rights Reserved.

How To Prove a Pomeranian is a Purebred

How To Prove a Pomeranian is a Purebred

pomeranian puppyHow can you tell if the Pomeranian you’re about to buy, or the Pom you already own is truly purebred? There are a number of ways to determine whether this is the case. If you purchase your Pom from a Show Pomeranian breeder, you’ll be given pedigree papers that guarantee your new puppy is a purebred. There are a few reasons why a puppy may not be registered. One very common scam is to tell potential buyers that the puppy’s parents have the correct kennel club paperwork. However, what does “the paperwork” actually cover? Do the papers state that the puppy is microchipped? Does this mean kennel club paperwork? Or perhaps it’s to do with council registration. Have you actually seen these documents? Lots of people get Pomeranians through adoption, taking the dog from a friend or relative or other sources where paperwork wasn’t supplied. If you’re in this situation, you should read the Kennel Club standards of breeding for Pomeranians. Then carefully examine the dog to check if he does meet the rigid standards required. However, this doesn’t prove he’s a purebred. Rescue organisations frequently will advertise dogs as crossbred when they’re obviously purebred. The reason is that if paperwork isn’t available, that dog is regarded as crossbred. DNA tests. One easy way to determine whether your dog is a true purebred is through DNA testing. Without the necessary paperwork, this is the only definitive way to prove the breed. This type of testing has become extremely advanced in recent years. There are many kennel clubs that won’t register a dog unless a DNA test has been carried out. It’s not complicated or expensive to do. There are numerous companies that can do this DNA testing and more are rising up all the time. The most common test is to do a mouth saliva swab. The sample is sent off for analysis and 2 to 4 weeks later the results will come back. Most vets can do this test for you. DNA testing can determine if the dog is a purebred. If his origins aren’t known, the test can usually reveal the breeds of the dog’s parents. Do some research before choosing a testing company as pricing and accuracy rates can vary. If both parents are purebreds, it’s easier to identify a dog’s parents. Your vet can arrange for the test to be done. He’ll take the samples and send them away. Once they come back, he can tell you the answers to your questions. Copyright Pomeranian.Org. All Rights Reserved.

How smart is a Pomeranian ?

How smart is a Pomeranian ?

pomeranian dogYou obviously know your pet Pomeranian is very smart. However, you may sometimes wonder how smart the Pomeranian dog breed is in general, when compared to other dog breeds and also to people. The official description of the Pomeranian includes information such as: an inquisitive animal; is quite expressive and is very alert. Even though the Pom may seem to be clever, as a breed, can Poms be described as intelligent? Has an actual rating system ever been developed and, if it has, where on the ladder would Pomeranians be listed? How can you even test this? Does dog intelligence resemble an IQ for humans? Will it just tell you how well your dog can learn? If it does, what can you do to help you dog maximise his full potential? An overall picture of dog intelligence. When trying to work out how intelligent dogs really are, there are a number of elements that must be considered. Language comprehension. This is a huge part of assessing the intelligence of our canine friends. Most dogs living in a home where there’s lots of interaction will comprehend approximately 165 words. So your assumption that your pet only knew a few simple commands and greetings, you’re wrong. Some dogs know less and others know more. Breeds that are considered to be in the top 20% when it comes to being smart can comprehend up to 250 different words. However, even if they know 165 words, that’s about the same as a two year old child. Memory capacity. This is much more than just memorising different words. It also covers the way a dog will look at an object and, weeks later, he can still remember the same object. People do it this way too. The tales of dogs who get separated from their loving owners for a long time and, when reunited, they’re ecstatic are all true. Assuming dogs have a short memory is a myth. Awareness. This covers how a dog can understand what’s around him and his environment. He clearly demonstrates his intelligence when you take him to the dog park ort into a pet store (both places he visits regularly). If you grab the brush and he runs off because he doesn’t like it…that’s smart. If he walks to his leash and gets excited, that’s also being smart. These are all clear examples that your Pom is aware of what’s going on around him. Perception. In some ways this resembles awareness but is significantly more because it includes how your dog uses his five senses to work out what is going on. Sight, touch, sound, smell and taste can all help him identify what objects are. This (surprising to some) actually includes using the Earth’s magnetic field. Scientists have verified that dogs can sense Earth’s magnetic field (known as Magnetoreception. They carried out studies on dogs and their use of this magnetic field. The dogs had to be off their leash and in an open space. Their studies concluded that the dogs preferred to line their bodies up along a north-south axis and then urinate and/or defecate. However, why they did it this way wasn’t known. They studied 70 dogs from 37 toy breeds (but not Poms) over a two year period.  In every single instance, they were lined up in a north-south direction. While it’s a wise idea to have your Pomeranian on a leash for bathroom breaks, if your yard is fenced off, try not using the leash and see what he does.pomeranian dog Social cognition. This can be a good way to tell how smart your dog is. It relates to how well your pet interprets certain social cues. One example used in numerous studies was to put an item under a bucket. There are two buckets and the dog should be able to tell you which one it’s under. The idea is not to pat the bucket but to try pointing or looking at it and seeing what the dog does. The study concluded that dogs were smarter than chimps and human babies. It’s essential to understand that dogs are always learning from the things you do and they never stop learning. The smallest of gestures or looks can tell them what you’re thinking or about to do. They can tell him what you feel and what your expectations are of him as well. Appreciating this can assist you in finding the best ways to handle your pet’s separation anxiety. Problem solving. You can teach your dog how to solve problems. For example, if he presses a button with his paw to reveal a hidden treat. Some games are useful for dog and owner to play together as they help sharpen his skills. More on this subject later in the article. Emotional intelligence To test the intelligence of a Pomeranian or any other dog breed, you need to test the range of his emotions. Testing can help compare the emotional ability of a Pom when compared to a person. pomeranian dogPeople’s abilities to feel and express emotions expands as they grow older. For example, a child can be excited from birth but generally can’t express contempt until around the age of five years. Studies on Pomeranians have proved that emotions are at least comparable to a 2 and 1/2 year old toddler. Obviously some will be more and others will be less. Studies have proven the existence of these canine emotions: excitement, distress, contentment, disgust, fear, anger, joy, suspicion, shyness, affection and love. What’s more important to know is that the emotions generally develop in this specific order. By the time your Pom is four months old, he has the ability to express all of them. The same applies in toy breeds. Larger breeds can take up to six months. Studies further reveal that dogs stop just short of developing guilt, shame or pride. However, they can still walk proudly and a dog obviously feels guilty if he does something wrong. So how does this happen? People develop pride at around the age of three years. Canine overall development stops at “around” the age of 2.5 years and these are only rough figures. Dogs have proven they can feel shy and so, by definition, confidence is the opposite so they should also feel confident. Some people believe pride and confidence are the same but there’s a clear distinction between them. A dog can feel confident but not pride. People can feel proud and that can lead to ego which can affect the way the brain works. With guilt, if your puppy has chewed up your slippers, can it be possible that he feels no guilt? Emotional intelligence in dogs is a very controversial topic because most dogs have at least some semblance of emotions, regardless of where they live and how they’re treated. In one study, dogs were left alone in a room with lots of things they could shred. Later, the owners did the shredding but made the dogs watch and then the owners looked at their dogs with a very unhappy face. The dogs behaved the same as if they had done the shredding themselves. It’s believed that dogs sense their owners’ non-verbal cues that tell them how they should behave, feel and react when something like this happens. Some scientists claim that, if a dog tucks his tail, lowers his ears, poses in a specific way and has other indicators of shame, it’s actually because he’s fearful, submissive or, perhaps, both. How do dogs learn? A dog learns in order of rank or priority. If he feels superior to another dog or a person, he generally ignores them. Puppies learn by watching adult dogs. Dogs of all ages learn through commands given by owners. However, there are occasions where a dog might do something after seeing a subordinate do it. As an example, an adult dog may check out something a puppy is playing with or checking out. However, most of the time when a dog is learning something new, it’s generally more readily learned when coming from a higher ranking dog or person. This is why it’s crucial for owners of Pomeranians to quickly and firmly establish their identities as leaders (aka Alphas) before trying to teach or housebreak a Pom. If your dog doesn’t acknowledge that you’re the alpha, you won’t accomplish much. How Intelligent are Pomeranians? There are two elements that must be considered:pomeranian dog 1. Overall intelligence. We have already covered the myriad of ways to test the intelligence of dogs. That included: memory, language comprehension, emotional capacity, problem-solving skills, social understanding, awareness and perception. Consider all these factors and the result is that dogs are, on average, as smart as toddlers between 2 and 2.5 years of age. Obviously some Poms will be lower and others will be higher. The bottom line is that your Pom is like your toddler, with similar levels of intelligence. Lots of people do treat their dogs as children, sometimes better than children. 2. Stanley Coren, a Canadian author and professor of canine psychology, wrote a book called “The Intelligence of Dogs,” in 1994 and revised it in 1996. Because there weren’t other supporting sources to back his claims, his book was highly controversial at the time. However, it discusses a method of ranking 80 different dog breeds in order of intelligence. A large number of people disagreed with the rankings for numerous reasons including the following: • He never saw or interacted with dogs. • The dogs involved were only measure in terms of obedience and work. • Judges were all from the US and Canadian Kennel Clubs who assessed dogs during trials in the show rings. • Only 199 people provided information on which to base the assessment and information published in the book. Later on, owners of some dogs were asked for their assessment of canine intelligence of their own dogs. Some breeds matched the other list and others didn’t. The Pomeranian is number 23 on the intelligence ranking list which is good. It puts them in an “excellent working dog” group. Dogs above them on the ladder were considered the “brightest dogs.” The Pom category had 22 breeds of dogs including the Cocker Spaniel, Miniature Schnauzer and Collie. The top dog on the ladder is the Border Collie. The Poodle is number Two. The bottom rung belongs to the Afghan Hound. However, it’s vital that you understand that not all dogs in any breed will have the same level of intelligence. Tips to help your pom demonstrate how smart he is. Dogs need the opportunity to learn. If you found a neglected dog living in a crate by the side of the road, he wouldn’t have many skills. He could learn but isn’t given the chance. If he was taken home by some kind soul and cared for and given the freedom to learn, he would be a much happier, healthier dog and would become much smarter. These tips will help your Pom learn more: pomeranian dog1. Dogs have the same five senses that humans are, but they’re much sharper. Spend time in the garden, the local dog park, in a specific room in your home or anywhere else you think of where he can do a bit of investigating, using his senses. After a while, hide a treat in your home and see if he can locate it just through smell. Use other nonverbal cues such as nodding or shaking your head as he gets closer or further away. Each time you get him to do these types of things, it helps his mind become sharper. 2. Train your Pom to understand words. Commands help but there are more words to use than sit or heel. A dog generally understands 165 words, the same amount as a toddler. Your pet is keen to learn new words so teach him! You can start teaching him words by grabbing a few objects and, one by one, hold each item and say its name. Do it over and over again until he knows what they are. Once you have accomplished that, put them in a line and tell him to choose one. Did he do that? If so, praise him and give him a treat. Repetition is the key to learning for dogs as their long term memory is much stronger than their short term memory. Once you have done this enough times with those three items, start again with a different set of three. When a dog is given the opportunities to demonstrate his intelligence, life is more enjoyable for you both. Keep a list of all his words to see what the end result is. You’ll be quite surprised. 3. Play different games that help your dog learn. Fetch is a good game because it’s great exercise and helps strengthen your bond with your pet. Mind games are as essential as physical ones. Hide one of his treats under one of three upside down cups and see if he can choose the one it’s under. If he figures it out, shuffle them around to make it harder. One last thought. Your  Pomeranian really is your child in many ways. Let him enjoy a long, healthy life by appreciating how smart he is. He reads nonverbal cues correctly, can sense your emotions and knows what you’re saying, even if it’s not every word. Dogs have such a wide range of emotions including love. You know how much you love your pet but isn’t it truly amazing to know that feeling is reciprocated? Share as much of your life with your pet as possible. Avoid emotions such as suspicion and fear. Focus on happy emotions such as joy and contentment. Copyright Pomeranian.org. All Rights Reserved.

The Pomeranian’s  tail

The Pomeranian’s tail

A characteristic of the breed. The tail is profusely covered with long, harsh, straight hair and should be carried high and flat over the back. A low tail set spoils the outline of the Pomeranian.

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Pomeranian Hindquarters

Pomeranian Hindquarters

Angulation of the hindquarters must balance front angulation. Viewed from behind, the pom’s legs are Sorry the complete article is only available to our Premium members. Please join us now.

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The Pomeranian’s feet

The Pomeranian’s feet

The Pomeranian’s feet must be small, compact and resemble a cat’s paw with strong and straight  pasterns. Sorry the complete article is only available to our Premium members. Please join us now.
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